Genzebe Dibaba Would Feel More Comfortable If Athletes Are Vaccinated Against Coronavirus

 

Genzebe Dibaba believes it would be a more comfortable experience at the Tokyo Games if athletes are vaccinated against coronavirus and is confident organisers will do all they can to protect competitors at the Olympics.

The Oympics are just 100 days away

Wednesday marks 100 days until the Games are due to begin in the Japanese capital, a year later than planned after the original dates in 2020 were scuppered by the pandemic.

The health crisis continues to cause issues for nations across the globe but the message from the International Olympics Committee (IOC) and from the Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee has thus far been that the show will go on.

While international fans are banned from attending, and social-distancing measures, track-and-trace systems and temperature checks will be enforced, a vaccination against COVID-19 will not be a pre-requisite to participate in Tokyo.

Dibaba won silver in the 1500 meters in 2016

Middle and long-distance runner Dibaba, a silver medallist in the 1500 metres at Rio 2016 and the world record holder over that distance, thinks athletes should have a jab for the Games.

“Yes, I think it’s safe and more comfortable to manage, to meet with the other athletes,” Dibaba told Stats Perform News.

“[I think it’s] better to take the vaccine.”

As part of the solutions to try and prevent transmission of the virus at the Games, Tokyo 2020 and the IOC have come up with ‘Playbooks’ for athletes, officials and the media to follow – which includes having to complete an activity book outlining plans while in the city.

Measures will be taken by IOC, despite vaccinations being optional

Regular testing will also be enforced, with athletes being checked every four days, and Dibaba acknowledged organisers are doing what they can to put on a safe Games.

“It’s hard to feel safe because it’s a virus and you can get it at any minute,” she added.

“But since it’s the Olympics, I know they will do everything they can to protect us.”

Dibaba spoke about the difficulties athletes have faced in training for an Olympics facing so much uncertainty.

But the Ethiopian – a world champion in 2015 – is still focused on moving up a step on the podium in Tokyo, even if she feels a crack at breaking her own 1500m world record may have to wait a little while.

“For now I’m getting ready for the Olympics, not for the record,” Dibaba said.

“It’s a race, since it’s a record anyone can break it if they work hard. If they go for the record I will be there.

“If not I’m just working for the Olympic Games, not for the record. After the Olympics, I promise you I will try one more time that I will go for the record.”

Tokyo Games 100 days to go: Lightning Bolt in Beijing and Freeman’s spacesuit – 10 of the greatest moments in Olympics history

Share This Song With Friends on social media Below:

Upload Your Song


Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*